Blog Archives

#blogging4charity – V is for Vocation

Being unemployed has got me to thinking about the different vocations I have aspired to at various points in my life. One of the first dreams I had was to be an astronaut. I remember being fascinated by space and knowing all the planet in the solar system. It’s why I got so excited by the solar eclipse last week. I love watching Stargazing Live and love trying to remember the different constellations I have learnt over the years.  Read the rest of this entry

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#DDChat Goes Weekly!

First of all a massive thank you to everyone who took part in yesterday’s #DDChat on Twitter discussing all things dyslexia. It was the best one yet, I couldn’t keep up fast enough with the fantastic discussions!

We decided last night that #DDChat will now be changing from a monthly chat to a weekly chat taking place every Thursday from 8-10pm GMT with the format of an hour of questions followed by an open floor for discussion.

If you have any topics you would like us to discuss, then please go to the #DDChat tab at the top of the page and fill in the form.

I hope to see you all next Thursday on Twitter!

Dyslexia and Me: “Unrecognised dyslexia is costing the UK economy in excess of £1 billion per year”

There is a good fight going on for better help in schools for kids with dyslexia. I see it everyday on social media both from parents on discussion boards to groups like the American Decoding Dyslexia heroes (yes, that is how I see them, heroes and heroines) pushing for change in schools! It’s fantastic to see and I really hope that in the near future there is far better support for kids in school.

However, the battle to support adults with dyslexia doesn’t seem to be heard as loudly. I know I am going back to cover this topic once again, but I feel that this is an issue that is largely unrecognised. When you say ‘dyslexia’ people instantly assume ‘kids’ and ‘school’ not ‘adults’ and ’employment/unemployment’ or ‘prison’.  Read the rest of this entry

The Journal: Part 4

Journal 01  Read the rest of this entry

Dyslexia and Me: Dyslexia at Work

The one thing you will see me campaigning for is support for adults with dyslexia. There are so many charities, groups and parent networks that are pushing for change in schools, but there aren’t enough people (in my opinion) pushing for change in the way adults with dyslexia are treated. We’re kind of left to get on with it! This really needs to change, especially when so many people with dyslexia are unemployed or struggle to find work.  Read the rest of this entry

Dyslexia and Me: E is for Extra Time

One thing that I have been very grateful for when at school, college and university is extra time in exams and/or handing in essays. This is a topic that I have seen deemed as ‘unfair’ by some people, but I would like to discuss how extra time in exams and essays should be something given to all dyslexic students and should be considered by employers within the workplace.  Read the rest of this entry

Poll Results: Do you feel comfortable about telling your employer that you have dyslexia?

The poll for March has now closed. Thank you to all of those who took part.

The question posed was:
Do you feel comfortable about telling your employer that you have dyslexia?

The results were as follows: Read the rest of this entry

Question of the Month

Dyslexia Scotland asked via Twitter: Do you feel comfortable about telling your employer that you have dyslexia?

So would you feel comfortable telling your employer?

Dyslexia and Me: What you see, What I see

Dyslexia and Me

People often ask me what it’s like visually when I am reading. When you grow up looking through your own eyes, I guess you don’t realise that you’re seeing things so differently until someone asks. The best way I have found to describe my vision is like pixels on a computer or TV screen. Each of the pixels makes up a more solid colour through RGB. When I look at solid colours or shades, I can still see other colours flashing around, though I know it is a white wall or a red book or a pitch black room. Even when there is no light at all, I still see colours. In fact, it becomes even worse! I walk a lot slower and cautiously in the dark because my vision to make out shapes is distorted by flashing ‘pixels’ of colour that cloud my vision. Read the rest of this entry

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