Monthly Archives: June 2015

Dyslexia and Me: Reaction to The Guardian’s Secret Teacher

Yesterday, The Guardian posted an article online called Secret Teacher: we are too quick to label children who aren’t perfect. I have shared it on social media to see reaction from the dyslexic community, but I thought I would write a response in the blog to the article too.

Knowing where to start with this is difficult. I have given my opinions on social media already, but rather than copy and paste, it is probably best to dissect the article rather than a gut reaction.

Firstly let me note that I am neither a parent nor a teacher, but I have been through the education system as an undiagnosed dyslexic who asked for help on more than one occasion.  Read the rest of this entry

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Genealogy and Me: Waterloo

Today is the 200th anniversary of the Battle of Waterloo. The Napoleonic Wars were never an era of history I knew much about or was particularly interested until a few years ago when studying my family tree. Now I am desperate to find out more information on several members of my family, both directly linked or great uncles, who served during the Napoleonic Wars. Here is a bit of what I have found out so far.  Read the rest of this entry

Dyslexia and Me: Celebrating Variety

One thing I have seen repeated on social media groups, Twitter feeds and blogs etc, has been that giving examples of famous dyslexic people can have a negative rather than a positive effect. Using the likes of Richard Branson as a ‘pin up’ for dyslexia can leave some dyslexics feeling down about themselves. So how can we promote the positives of dyslexia without isolating those of us who will never achieve what Richard Branson has?  Read the rest of this entry

Dyslexia and Me: Remembering Norwich

Something that has stuck with me for years now is the guilt of not remembering Norwich. I feel so bad about it that I haven’t been able to ask questions to this massive black hole in my memory. But even when we visited Norwich in July 2007 there was nothing that struck me as familiar which I would have expected if I had been there before.  Read the rest of this entry

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